(604)461-2725 info@nvchiro.com
Don’t let Runner’s Knee Stop You From Training!

Don’t let Runner’s Knee Stop You From Training!

What is Runner’s Knee

The snow is melting, and it’s time get your runners out to get out there and hit the pavement. If you, or someone you care about is suffering needlessly from sore knees, then read on!
Runner’s knee also known as patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is very common. This is when the stress from poor biomechanics and alignment while running causes irritation of the kneecap which results in a uncomfortable feeling around the knees and joint capsule.

How Can I Prevent Runner’s Knee?

Runner’s knee is the result of poor knee alignment. You could brace your knee, but this is typically not the source of the problem. Poor alignment starts in the feet and pelvis. So, the more elegant way to prevent runner’s knee is by having great alignment in the feet and pelvis.

Your Feet:

Foot problems (usually pronation) are the result of weak and uncoordinated foot muscles. This throws the leg out of alignment and stresses the knee, creating pain. If you are training you should be completely comfortable. If you aren’t, then you should schedule a computerized gait analysis (Call us at 604-461-2725).  In addition to having a good (and new) pair of running shoes, you can prevent runner’s knee by considering a pair of orthotics.  Orthotics re-train the muscles of your feet, making them stronger and more resilient over time.

Your Pelvis and Spine:

The same way plaque builds on your teeth, daily stress causes tension to build in the muscles of the hips and pelvis.  The result is misalignment.  Our state-of-the-art chiropractic methods reduces the tension in the muscles so that your hips and pelvis (and your legs) re-align.  This allows your leg muscles to act with the most strength and coordination, giving you the best alignment and performance possible.  We can evaluate the function and alignment of your spine using the CoreScore system at each of your evaluations.

The Great Orthotic Sale!

Until February 3rd 2017 we are giving $50.00 off orthotics to help train and run comfortably! Book a gait analysis and consultation by calling our clinic at 604-461-2725 or email us at info@nvchiro.com to reserve your spot and your discount.

Also, refer to the following link to Dr. Barone’s video about runner’s knee. http://ow.ly/LC7Z307X1wm

Written by Iris Lai, Tech CA. (Edited by Dr. Gary Barone)

Man in Starting Blocks

Get 2017 Off To A Great Start

Eat Healthy During Christmas

Eat Healthy During Christmas

I love the holidays, and I love to eat, so holiday dinners are my favourite!  Buttery potatoes, juicy roasts, colourful trifles… you name it, I’m all over it!

The problem is that I often find myself going overboard, especially at a party. At best, I end up with a tummy ache afterwards, and at worst I find myself getting sick days afterwards. This year, I plan on sticking to a plan so I don’t end up with that awful rolling-on-the-floor feeling. Here’s how:

Prep

Have a pre-party snack before going out, to curb any tendency to overeat. Choose something that has protein in it, like yogurt or nuts. Protein requires more time and energy from your stomach to break down than other macro-nutrients, so you feel a little fuller for longer.

Eat and be merry

Stay hydrated by drinking lots of water during the day of and the day after a holiday event. During dinner, have a non-alcoholic drink between glasses of alcoholic beverages, like soda, juice, or water. Your throat and your head will thank you!

When filling up your plate, choose the best-for-you foods first (like vegetables) before moving on to other, richer offerings. Don’t hang around the buffet table during appetizers. Grab what you like, and then move to another area where you can socialize without the urge to constantly graze.

Recover

Don’t skip meals to compensate for a large dinner or extra drinks. It’s important to continue to consume vital micro-nutrients to help your body recover and stay on top of your health, so have a balanced breakfast such as a spinach and mushroom omelette.

A smoothie is another great way to get your nutrients in. What I love about them is that you can throw almost any fruit or vegetable in and it will taste delicious. If you want to really level up on the nutritional benefits, you can add one scoop of a whole food supplement and mix it in so the taste of it is practically invisible! (If you choose one like Green’s First, it also tastes great on its own!)

I hope you’ve found these tips helpful. Happy holidays, and bon apétit!

By Courtney Chan, Chiropractic Assistant

4 Tips to Manage Holiday Stress

The holiday season is a happy time, and is also a busy time.

As the urgencies pile up, so do the emotional, physical, and chemical stressors. Shopping, meal planning, financial strain, cold weather, and the increased intake of alcohol, sugar and fats are all examples of stress factors that negatively affect our wellbeing. Here are a few pointers on making the most of your holiday season.

Don’t overdo it

Whether its binging on stuffing or working extra holiday hours, watch out for overconsumption. For example, alcohol may feel like it decreases your stress, but having too much actually acts as a chemical stressor and puts your health at risk. Decide on your limits ahead of any event, and remember that it’s okay to say “no” when someone offers you something.

Anticipate potential problems

“If you fail to plan, you plan to fail.” Think back to what you did last year, and come up with a plan to avoid any of those same pitfalls. Give yourself extra time for everything, from gift shopping to meal preparation to travel. Make lists and recruit family members or friends to help you with errands. Don’t sweat the little things – just focus on the big picture and what really matters: spending time together with loved ones.

Stick to your healthy habits

When our to-do lists grow, we often forget to take care of ourselves. This leaves us more at risk for catching a cold or flu, or old injuries being aggravated. Doing your weekly amount of exercise, maintaining a full nutritional diet and getting adjusted regularly are all part of preventing illness. Sleep for a full 8 hours and get a good night’s rest to prepare you for each busy day. Take a walk to blow off steam if you need to. Make time for yourself.

Give thanks

Thanksgiving isn’t the only time we should find gratitude. Don’t forget about the good stress that comes at this time of year! Seeing loved ones again, enjoying winter activities, and giving others gifts are all types of stress that contribute to your personal growth. Savour those moments.

Most of all, remember to take everything in stride and enjoy your holidays! It’s the end of the year – you deserve it.

By Courtney Chan, Chiropractic Assistant
Does Glucosamine Really Help Your Joints?

Does Glucosamine Really Help Your Joints?

Glucosamine is a naturally occuring chemical produced by our bodies. It is in the fluids around our joints, and helps create the other chemicals that build ligaments, tendon, and cartilage. These soft tissues protect the ends of the bones from rubbing against each other and act like cushioning when you move. Thus, the state of these tissues is essential to joint health.

Degeneration of the joint tissues can happen with cartilage damage, musculoskeletal injuries, and progressive chronic conditions, and is often a major concern for individuals as they age. However, many studies have shown good evidence that taking glucosamine orally is effective in aiding joint health, and preventing joint-related disease.

For example, knee osteoarthritis is one of the most common forms of arthritis that affects singular joints. Throughout the progress of this disease, the tissues in and around the joints become worn down. This minimizes the shock absorption abilities of your joints. Symptoms of osteoarthritis include join pain, stiffness, and eventual loss of function.

A study published by the American Medical Association has shown that the added intake of glucosamine helped in delaying the long-term progression of knee osteoarthritis. As you age, the regeneration of essential amino acids, sugars, and proteins slows down. By supplementing your natural stores of glucosamine, you are stimulating the production of collagen, which gives your soft tissues elasticity. Your cartilage begins to rebuild inside your joints as it receives the essential nutrients.

Another study published by BJSM suggests that a regular dosage of glucosamine may be as effective at pain reduction as ibuprofen, a common pain relief drug. After receiving glucosamine therapy, participants reported less joint pain. Thus, you may find that the short-term supplemental use of glucosamine eases your joint pain, and you may prefer the lower side effects of glucosamine over ibuprofen. Be sure to always follow the recommended guidelines for dosage on the packaging.

Provide your body with the building blocks it needs to create healthy tissue, and you help your body heal itself!

Where can I get glucosamine?

At NewPort Village Chiropractic, we offer an array of supplements and vitamins that can help you in your quest for better nutrition and overall health.

The glucosamine supplement we carry is Procosa by USANA. It is 100% vegetarian, unlike most supplements derived from shellfish and other animal-based ingredients. Procosa is also formulated with Vitamin C, an essential nutrient for your immune system. It has an added Meriva complex that helps you absorb the nutrients.

As part of our Anti-Aging month theme, we are offering a 15% off discount for our USANA Procosa supplements! This offer stands while supplies last.

Interested in learning more about anti-aging? Get our FREE e-Book on the myths of aging.

By Courtney Chan, Chiropractic Assistant

Can music boost your running performance?

The Vancouver Rock and Roll Half Marathon is coming up this weekend, and we couldn’t be more excited by such a cool event. Did you know about the special relationship between music and running?

There is much research that supports the performance-boosting properties of music. Music can increase your motivation and your mood, two factors that play a huge part in increasing your running performance.

Some people also find that listening to music while running helps them keep a steady cadence. According to a study published by the Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, runners can synchronize their steps to the beat with the right tempo of music. Songs that have a more prominent beat can help with this.

A study by Judy Edworthy and Hannah Waring found that runners who listen louder and faster music will take on faster running tempos. Compared to no-music condition, participants listening to fast and loud music ran harder for the same amount of perceived exertion. This means that though both groups thought they were running hard, those who were listening to music ran faster.

Many running races, including the Rock and Roll Half Marathon, take advantage of these benefits by having live bands perform throughout the race course. A pumped up atmosphere puts you in the right mindset to set a new personal best!

So keep your headphones out, and good luck this weekend!

What else can I do to improve my performance?

  • Having a proper warm-up and cool-down routine with stretching is key for injury prevention.
  • Wear proper footwear, and replace your shoes when they are worn down.
  • Cross-train and do other types of physical activity (such as tennis) to prevent muscle overuse injuries.

Many runners also find chiropractic to be an asset to their performance. Running on hard surfaces can create imbalances in the body caused by the forceful impacts. Chiropractic care can help with range of motion, injury prevention, and injury recovery by identifying those imbalances and keeping your body in proper alignment. Your chiropractor can also assist with fitting customized orthotics when necessary to improve your biomechanical function. Regular chiropractic care can help minimize the time you spend in recovery, and increase the time you spend doing the things you love.

By Courtney Chan, Chiropractic Assistant